Radio Recap – Jay Sekulow Returns to Broadcast | American Center for Law and Justice

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Radio Recap – Jay Sekulow Returns to Broadcast

By 

Jay Sekulow

|

February 07, 2020

2 min read

ACLJ

Today, after the trial of the century, as some people are calling it, I returned to the radio studio to discuss the acquittal of the President.

On today’s Jay Sekulow Live we discussed the impeachment trial and the Senate’s acquittal of President Trump.

I’m very glad to be back, now that the impeachment trial and the proceedings are over (which I engaged in my private capacity as one of the President’s lawyers).

As ACLJ Executive Director Jordan Sekulow said about the trial:

It is certainly a trial unlike any other in the United States courts systems. It was very long for trial purposes, but in the scheme of things about as short as you can do it.

We certainly couldn’t have moved any quicker. The difference in the strategy was, the Democrat managers literally up took every moment they had, even when you could tell that the Senators were done. As I recall there was one night when we went until two in the morning. When they presented their case, it seemed they were going until eleven o’clock at night, for the three nights.

Our first day was on a Saturday. We went for two hours. What we did in that two hours was to summarize what the entire defense was going to be in the case, by laying out an overview. What we did on Monday, which I think really worked, was we had a lot of different lawyers speak. We had well known lawyers from different political parties. You had Alan Dershowitz, a Democrat. There were some people who were not really politically affiliated at all, that were lawyers. On constitutional issues, you had Ken Starr. So we had what I would call a very diverse team of lawyers.

What I tried to do that very first day was set it up so that in between each one I would go up and kind of summarize what was coming. Then the lawyer would make the actual argument. There was one where I made a main argument for about thirty minutes. Then I would pitch it to the next lawyer and they made their next arguments.

We dovetailed it. We opened with Ken Starr, opening on the constitutional issue, and we closed with Alan Dershowitz, also on the constitutional issue on the first day. I think that went well. On the last day, I believe we went two and a half hours.  We really kept it tight, intentionally.

The verdict obviously speaks for itself.

You can listen to the entire episode with a lot more discussion and details about the Senate impeachment trial here.

Jay Sekulow

More Articles

Jay Sekulow is Chief Counsel of the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), one of the most prestigious law firms in the country.

Jay Sekulow

Jay Sekulow is Chief Counsel of the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), one of the most prestigious law firms in the country.

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Radio Recap – Jay Sekulow Returns to Broadcast

By 

Jay Sekulow

|

February 07, 2020

2 min read

ACLJ

Today, after the trial of the century, as some people are calling it, I returned to the radio studio to discuss the acquittal of the President.

On today’s Jay Sekulow Live we discussed the impeachment trial and the Senate’s acquittal of President Trump.

I’m very glad to be back, now that the impeachment trial and the proceedings are over (which I engaged in my private capacity as one of the President’s lawyers).

As ACLJ Executive Director Jordan Sekulow said about the trial:

It is certainly a trial unlike any other in the United States courts systems. It was very long for trial purposes, but in the scheme of things about as short as you can do it.

We certainly couldn’t have moved any quicker. The difference in the strategy was, the Democrat managers literally up took every moment they had, even when you could tell that the Senators were done. As I recall there was one night when we went until two in the morning. When they presented their case, it seemed they were going until eleven o’clock at night, for the three nights.

Our first day was on a Saturday. We went for two hours. What we did in that two hours was to summarize what the entire defense was going to be in the case, by laying out an overview. What we did on Monday, which I think really worked, was we had a lot of different lawyers speak. We had well known lawyers from different political parties. You had Alan Dershowitz, a Democrat. There were some people who were not really politically affiliated at all, that were lawyers. On constitutional issues, you had Ken Starr. So we had what I would call a very diverse team of lawyers.

What I tried to do that very first day was set it up so that in between each one I would go up and kind of summarize what was coming. Then the lawyer would make the actual argument. There was one where I made a main argument for about thirty minutes. Then I would pitch it to the next lawyer and they made their next arguments.

We dovetailed it. We opened with Ken Starr, opening on the constitutional issue, and we closed with Alan Dershowitz, also on the constitutional issue on the first day. I think that went well. On the last day, I believe we went two and a half hours.  We really kept it tight, intentionally.

The verdict obviously speaks for itself.

You can listen to the entire episode with a lot more discussion and details about the Senate impeachment trial here.

Jay Sekulow

More Articles

Jay Sekulow is Chief Counsel of the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), one of the most prestigious law firms in the country.

Jay Sekulow

Jay Sekulow is Chief Counsel of the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), one of the most prestigious law firms in the country.

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